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({{delete|This tip adds a grand total of one very basic keybind (:tabn and :tabp already mapped by default).}})
(Remove delete; add todo; copy in comments from 1223)
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{{delete|This tip adds a grand total of one very basic keybind (:tabn and :tabp already mapped by default).}}
 
 
 
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|version=7.0
 
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Add the following lines to your vimrc:
 
Add the following lines to your vimrc:
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==Comments==
 
==Comments==
  +
{{Todo}}
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*Fix tip so it explains basics of tab navigation.
  +
*No point having a tip change the default keybindings for <tt>:tabn</tt> and <tt>:tabp</tt>. Explain the defaults.
  +
*Merge in any useful comments from below (some of which were moved in from [[VimTip1223]]).
  +
*Perhaps rename to "Using tab pages" (a simpler title that attempts to avoid confusion with the tab key).
  +
  +
----
 
Does not work in [ax]term.
 
Does not work in [ax]term.
   
 
----
 
----
Or you could use <tt>gt</tt> and <tt>gT</tt> without having to move your hands across the keyboard.
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Or you could use <tt>gt</tt> and <tt>gT</tt> without having to move your hands across the keyboard. Also, <tt>gt</tt> can take the tab number to jump directly to a tab.
   
 
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----
 
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[[Category:Tabs]]
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From deleted tip (VimTip1223) on moving window to a new tab:
  +
  +
I think this can be condensed to:
  +
<pre>
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:tab sp&lt;CR&gt;
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</pre>
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  +
Alternative way to move current window to a new tab is: &lt;Ctrl-w&gt; T (capital).
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  +
----
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When you use <tt>:tab ball</tt> - it makes out of all buffers a tab.
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  +
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Revision as of 12:02, April 22, 2008

Tip 1347 Printable Monobook Previous Next

created September 29, 2006 · complexity basic · author mchenryk · version 7.0


Add the following lines to your vimrc:

map <C-t> :tabnew<CR>
map <C-left> :tabp<CR>
map<C-right> :tabn<CR>

Then in gvim you have the following commands:

  • Ctrl-t – open a new tab
  • Ctrl-left arrow – move one tab to the left
  • Ctrl-right arrow – move one tab to the right

Comments

 TO DO 

  • Fix tip so it explains basics of tab navigation.
  • No point having a tip change the default keybindings for :tabn and :tabp. Explain the defaults.
  • Merge in any useful comments from below (some of which were moved in from VimTip1223).
  • Perhaps rename to "Using tab pages" (a simpler title that attempts to avoid confusion with the tab key).

Does not work in [ax]term.


Or you could use gt and gT without having to move your hands across the keyboard. Also, gt can take the tab number to jump directly to a tab.


I use Vim in Windows, so remapping C-Left isn't great for me. These are the mappings I use:

" Tab mappings
map <S-Up> :tabclose<CR>
map <S-Down> :tabnew<CR>
map <S-Left> gT
map <S-Right> gt
map <S-PageUp> :tabfirst<CR>
map <S-PageDown> :tablast<CR>

I used down for a new tab because I'm used to that from Opera's mouse gestures.


I prefer gt and gT. In any case <C-PgUp> and <C-PgDn> are the defaults for the same operations.

Just opening a new tab is kind of useless. I find :tabe <filename> more useful.


Instead of :tabe filename, I like :tabf filename, because it walks the path to find the name, instead of relying on an required explicit path/filename.


If you are working with tags or cscope, <Ctrl-T> is for popping the stack.


From deleted tip (VimTip1223) on moving window to a new tab:

I think this can be condensed to:

:tab sp<CR>

Alternative way to move current window to a new tab is: <Ctrl-w> T (capital).


When you use :tab ball - it makes out of all buffers a tab.


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